Today is Flag Day….What does it mean to you? Part two


1848-1851 - 30 Star Flag

1848-1851 - 30 Star Flag

• One star was added to the flag for the admission of Wisconsin
• James Polk, Zachary Taylor and Millard Fillmore served under this flag.

1851-1858 - 31 Star Flag

1851-1858 - 31 Star Flag

31 Star Flag
• One star was added to the flag for the admission of California
• Millard Fillmore, Franklin Pierce and James Buchanan served under this flag.

1858-1859 - 32 Star Flag

1858-1859 - 32 Star Flag

32 Star Flag
• One star was added to the flag for the admission of Minnesota
• James Buchanan was the only president to serve under this flag.

1859-1861 - 33 Star Flag

1859-1861 - 33 Star Flag

33 Star Flag
• One star was added to the flag for the admission of Oregon
• The Civil War began on April 12, 1861, under this flag
• James Buchanan and Abraham Lincoln served under this flag.

1861-1863 - 34 Star Flag

1861-1863 - 34 Star Flag

34 Star Flag
• One star was added to the flag for the admission of Kansas
• South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Tennessee, North Carolina, and Virginia seceded from the Union in 1861
• President Lincoln did not remove stars from the flag because he believed the Southern states were still part of the government
• In protest some Northeners cut 11 stars out of their personal flags
• Abraham Lincoln was the only president to serve under this flag.

1863-1865 - 35 Star Flag

1863-1865 - 35 Star Flag

35 Star Flag
• One star was added to the flag for the admission of West Virginia
• Virginia split into two separate states because parts supported the Confederacy and other parts supported the Union (the section that would become West Virginia supported the Union)
• This was the first time that a new state formed out of rebellion of the original state
• The Civil War ended on April 9, 1865, under this flag
• Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson served under this flag.

1865-1867 - 36 Star Flag

1865-1867 - 36 Star Flag

36 Star Flag
• One star was added to the flag for the admission of Nevada
• 3 months before the flag became official, a 36-star flag was used to cushion President Lincoln’s head the evening of his assassination at Ford’s Theatre
• “The Lincoln Flag” is currently on display at the Columns Museum of the Pike County Historical Society in Milford, PA
• Andrew Johnson was the only president to serve under this flag.

1867-1877 - 37 Star Flag

1867-1877 - 37 Star Flag

37 Star Flag
• One star was added to the flag for the admission of Nebraska
• Andrew Johnson, Ulysses S. Grant and Rutherford B. Hayes served under this flag.

1877-1890 - 38 Star Flag

1877-1890 - 38 Star Flag

38 Star Flag
• One star was added to the flag for the admission of Colorado
• Rutherford B. Hayes, James A. Garfield, Chester A. Arthur, Grover Cleveland and Benjamin Harrison all served under this flag.

1890-1891 - 43 Star Flag

1890-1891 - 43 Star Flag

43 Star Flag
• Five stars were added to the flag for the admission of North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Washington and Idaho
• Benjamin Harrison was the only president to serve under this flag.

1891-1896 - 44 Star Flag

1891-1896 - 44 Star Flag

44 Star Flag
• One star was added to the flag for the admission of Wyoming
• Benjamin Harrison and Grover Cleveland served under this flag.

1896-1908 - 45 Star Flag

1896-1908 - 45 Star Flag

45 Star Flag
• One star was added to the flag for the admission of Utah
• Grover Cleveland, William McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt served under this flag.

1908-1912 - 46 Star Flag

1908-1912 - 46 Star Flag

46 Star Flag
• One star was added to the flag for the admission of Oklahoma
• William H. Taft was the only president to serve under this flag.

1912-1959 - 48 Star Flag

1912-1959 - 48 Star Flag

48 Star Flag
• Two stars were added to the flag for the admission of New Mexico and Arizona
• President Taft passed an Executive Order in 1912 establishing proportions for the flag and arranging the stars in six horizontal rows of eight, with each star pointing upward
• This flag was in service for 47 years, lasting through two World Wars and making it the longest serving flag until July 4, 2007, when it will be succeeded by the 50-star American flag
• William H. Taft, Woodrow Wilson, Warren Harding, Calvin Coolidge, Herbert Hoover, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, and Dwight D. Eisenhower served under this flag.

1959-1960 - 49 Star Flag

1959-1960 - 49 Star Flag

49 Star Flag
• One Star was added for the admission of Alaska
• President Eisenhower passed an Executive Order in 1959 to have the stars arranged in 7 rows with 7 stars in each row, staggered horizontally and vertically
• Dwight D. Eisenhower was the only president to serve under this flag.

And now finally the last one……..

1960 - present

1960 - present

50 Star Flag
• One star was added to the flag for the admission of Hawaii
• 17-year-old Bob Heft predicted that Hawaii would gain statehood after Alaska, and designed a 50-star flag for his high school history class
• After Hawaii had been added, President Eisenhower selected Heft’s design to become the national emblem
• As of July 4, 2007, the 50-star flag will be America’s longest serving flag
• Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard M. Nixon, Gerald R. Ford, Jimmy Carter, Ronald W. Reagan, George Bush, William J. Clinton, George W. Bush and Barack Hussein Obama served under this flag.

Now you have the history of our grand ole flag. I hope that you enjoyed this history lesson, because it is something that really is not taught much anymore. All the goodness and God’s blessings to every American on this Flag Day for 2009.

God Bless America and her troops
God Bless my readers, my listeners on BTR and my viewers on You Tube….

-Robert-

About Robert P. Garding

I am a Reagan Conservative, who is very alarmed at the Liberals who have just lost their majority over our government, but continue to act like it never happened. They have to be stopped. NOW or even sooner.
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